From Hesitancy Framings to Vaccine Hesitancy Profiles: A Journey of Stance, Ontological Commitments and Moral Foundations

Authors

  • Maxwell A. Weinzierl Human Language Technology Research Institute The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Sanda M. Harabagiu Human Language Technology Research Institute The University of Texas at Dallas

Keywords:

Subjectivity in textual data; sentiment analysis; polarity/opinion identification and extraction, linguistic analyses of social media behavior, Organizational and group behavior mediated by social media; interpersonal communication mediated by social media, Psychological, personality-based and ethnographic studies of social media, Measuring predictability of real world phenomena based on social media, e.g., spanning politics, finance, and health

Abstract

While billions of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered, too many people remain hesitant. Twitter, with its substantial reach and daily exposure, is an excellent resource for examining how people frame their vaccine hesitancy and to uncover vaccine hesitancy profiles. In this paper we expose our processing journey from identifying Vaccine Hesitancy Framings in a collection of 9,133,471 original tweets discussing the COVID-19 vaccines, establishing their ontological commitments, annotating the Moral Foundations they imply to the automatic recognition of the stance of the tweet authors toward any of the CoVaxFrames that we have identified. When we found that 805,336 Twitter users had a stance towards some CoVaxFrames in either the 9,133,471 original tweets or their 17,346,664 retweets, we were able to derive nine different Vaccine Hesitancy Profiles of these users and to interpret these profiles based on the ontological commitments of the frames they evoked in their tweets and on value of their stance towards the evoked frames.

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Published

2022-05-31

How to Cite

Weinzierl, M. A., & Harabagiu, S. M. (2022). From Hesitancy Framings to Vaccine Hesitancy Profiles: A Journey of Stance, Ontological Commitments and Moral Foundations. Proceedings of the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media, 16(1), 1087-1097. Retrieved from https://ojs.aaai.org/index.php/ICWSM/article/view/19360