Conversational Neuro-Symbolic Commonsense Reasoning

Authors

  • Forough Arabshahi Facebook
  • Jennifer Lee Facebook
  • Mikayla Gawarecki Carnegie Mellon University
  • Kathryn Mazaitis Carnegie Mellon University
  • Amos Azaria Ariel University
  • Tom Mitchell Carnegie Mellon University

Keywords:

Neuro-Symbolic AI (NSAI), Common-Sense Reasoning, Conversational AI/Dialog Systems, Human-in-the-loop Machine Learning

Abstract

In order for conversational AI systems to hold more natural and broad-ranging conversations, they will require much more commonsense, including the ability to identify unstated presumptions of their conversational partners. For example, in the command "If it snows at night then wake me up early because I don't want to be late for work" the speaker relies on commonsense reasoning of the listener to infer the implicit presumption that they wish to be woken only if it snows enough to cause traffic slowdowns. We consider here the problem of understanding such imprecisely stated natural language commands given in the form of if-(state), then-(action), because-(goal) statements. More precisely, we consider the problem of identifying the unstated presumptions of the speaker that allow the requested action to achieve the desired goal from the given state (perhaps elaborated by making the implicit presumptions explicit). We release a benchmark data set for this task, collected from humans and annotated with commonsense presumptions. We present a neuro-symbolic theorem prover that extracts multi-hop reasoning chains, and apply it to this problem. Furthermore, to accommodate the reality that current AI commonsense systems lack full coverage, we also present an interactive conversational framework built on our neuro-symbolic system, that conversationally evokes commonsense knowledge from humans to complete its reasoning chains.

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Published

2021-05-18

How to Cite

Arabshahi, F., Lee, J., Gawarecki, M., Mazaitis, K., Azaria, A., & Mitchell, T. (2021). Conversational Neuro-Symbolic Commonsense Reasoning. Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 35(6), 4902-4911. Retrieved from https://ojs.aaai.org/index.php/AAAI/article/view/16623

Issue

Section

AAAI Technical Track Focus Area on Neuro-Symbolic AI